To the visitors at the Exhibition

On calligraphy and characters

Although I have only little idea about how much knowledge you, visitors to this exhibition, have about Chinese characters which we brought in to be an essential part of our culture around two thousand years ago from ancient China and new letters we uniquely produced out of the original ones, what I would like to emphasis about Chinese characters is that each character has not only “sound” but also “meaning”.

Therefore, as the Chinese characters spread images as well, we people in the orient who use them in daily life enjoy having fantasies about future happiness and prosperity of our children when we name them, thinking a lot about this “meaning” the Chinese characters provide.

And here, a question about how the ancient people created these characters and what kind of emotions they used to have came to me who continued practicing calligraphy since early childhood.

The most common theory is characters and (spoken) languages were originally tools or cornerstones for praying. Assumedly, ancient people would possess much sharper, stronger and more abundant sensitivity towards nature and spirituality than we people living in present time.

Thus, they must have thought that words and letters would bring them delight, and tried to guard the people important to them from the evil powers of the characters, or crossly, they even tried to curse their enemies using words and characters.

Well-known examples for noted above would be: Being careful not to use foul languages to prevent badness from happening and addressing someone just in front of you as “anata” meaning “somewhere far away” to guard them from the curse of language by pretending the conversational partner being far away form you.

When I declare “My hobby is calligraphy!”, from time to time, I get reactions such as, “Why don’t you draw or paint? Writing mere letters wouldn’t be very interesting. Painting beautiful flowers, sceneries or women would be more enjoyable, wouldn’t it?”

And the very answer to those questions would be the sublimed art growing from the sense of awe and even affection to the characters, letters and words of the ancient people.

Dear visitors to this exhibition, I here yearn for your appreciation of the works displayed in the venue with thoughts about how we consider “practice of writing” itself be noble and sacred, and not just a thought “Oh, I see numerous unfamiliar lines and forms.”

Kyoto, October 2017

Tomoko Minami

<To the homepage of this website.>

作品展においでの皆さまへ:

書道について・文字について

この作品展においでくださる皆さまが、約二千年前に中国から日本人が取り入れた漢字や、それから日本人が独自に生み出した文字についてどれほどご存知なのか、分かりかねるところでありますが、まず漢字について特にお伝えしたいのは、一つ一つの漢字には「音」だけでなくて、「意味」を有しているということです。

ですから、そこから広がるイメージなどもありますので、東洋の漢字を使う人々は、自分の子どもを名付けるときなどにも、自分の子どもの将来の幸せや繁栄を願い、この「意味」というものにあれこれと思いを巡らせたりします。

そしてここで、太古の人々はどのようにこの漢字を生み出し、また文字というものに対してどのような感慨を持っていたのだろうか・・・ということが幼い頃から書道を学んできた私の頭に浮かびます。

一般的な説としてよく指摘されるのは、文字や(音声による)言葉は、元来祈りの道具または礎であった、ということです。恐らく太古の人々は、現代を生きる我々よりも自然や霊性に対してはるかに鋭く、強く、豊かな感受性を持っていたことと思われます。

従って、言葉や文字が自分たちに喜びをもたらすと考えたり、また大事な人たちを言葉や文字の持つ呪詛から護ろうとしたり、あるいは反対に敵対する者たちを呪うためにさえ用いたりしたようです。

よく知られた例としては、悪いことが起こらないように悪い言葉を使わないように気をつけるとか、目の前にいる話し相手を言葉の呪いから護るためにその人物のことを「彼方の地」を意味する「あなた」と呼ぶことなどが挙げられます。

「書道が趣味です!」と言うと、ときとして「どうして絵画でないの? 字なんか書いてもつまらないのに。綺麗なお花や風景や女の人を描いた方がいいのでは?」という反応が返ってくることがあります。

そしてこうした問いに対する回答こそがまさに上に書きましたような太古の人々の文字や言葉に対する畏敬の念や、それでもなお、それらに対して憧れや愛情にも似た感情を持っていたことから延々と連なる文化こそが書道という芸術に昇華しているのだということになると考えます。

ご来場の皆さまには、是非とも「見慣れない字のようなものがたくさん書いてあるなあ」というだけでなくて、その「字を書く」という行為を人々が尊く、神聖なものであると感じていることに思いを馳せてご鑑賞くださることを切にお願いしたく存じます。

2017年10月京都にて

南知子

<このサイトのホームへ。>